Personification and pseudoscience

If you study the philosophy of science — and sometimes even if you just study science — then at some point you might get the urge to figure out what you mean when you say ‘science’. Can you distinguish the scientific from the non-scientific or the pseudoscientific? If you can then how? Does science have a defining method? If it does, then does following the steps of that method guarantee science, or are some cases just rhetorical performances? If you cannot distinguish science and pseudoscience then why do some fields seem clearly scientific and others clearly non-scientific? If you believe that these questions have simple answers then I would wager that you have not thought carefully enough about them.

Karl Popper did think very carefully about these questions, and in the process introduced the problem of demarcation:

The problem of finding a criterion which would enable us to distinguish between the empirical sciences on the one hand, and mathematics and logic as well as ‘metaphysical’ systems on the the other

Popper believed that his falsification criterion solved (or was an important step toward solving) this problem. Unfortunately due to Popper’s discussion of Freud and Marx as examples of non-scientific, many now misread the demarcation problem as a quest to separate epistemologically justifiable science from the epistemologically non-justifiable pseudoscience. With a moral judgement of Good associated with the former and Bad with the latter. Toward this goal, I don’t think falsifiability makes much headway. In this (mis)reading, falsifiability excludes too many reasonable perspectives like mathematics or even non-mathematical beliefs like Gandy’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis, while including much of in-principle-testable pseudoscience. Hence — on this version of the demarcation problem — I would side with Feyerabend and argue that a clear seperation between science and pseudoscience is impossible.

However, this does not mean that I don’t find certain traditions of thought to be pseudoscientific. In fact, I think there is a lot to be learned from thinking about features of pseudoscience. A particular question that struck me as interesting was: What makes people easily subscribe to pseudoscientific theories? Why are some kinds of pseudoscience so much easier or more tempting to believe than science? I think that answering these questions can teach us something not only about culture and the human mind, but also about how to do good science. Here, I will repost (with some expansions) my answer to this question.
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Falsifiability and Gandy’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis

RobinGandyIn 1936, two years after Karl Popper published the first German version of The Logic of Scientific Discovery and introduced falsifiability; Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post each published independent papers on the Entscheidungsproblem and introducing the lambda calculus, Turing machines, and Post-Turing machines as mathematical models of computation. The years after saw many more models, all of which were shown to be equivalent to each other in what they could compute. This was summarized in the Church-Turing thesis: anything that is computable is computable by a Turing machine. An almost universally accepted, but also incredibly vague, statement. Of course, such an important thesis has developed many variants, and exploring or contrasting their formulations can be very insightful way to understand and contrast different philosophies.

I believe that the original and most foundational version of the thesis is what I called Kleene’s purely mathematical formulation. Delving into this variant allowed us explore the philosophy of mathematics; Platonism; and the purpose, power and limitations of proof. However, because of the popularity of physicalism and authority of science, I doubt that Kleene’s is the most popular variant. Instead, when people think of the Church-Turing thesis, they often think of what is computable in the world around them. I like to associate this variant with Turing’s long time friend and student — Robin Gandy. I want to explore Gandy’s physical variant of the Church-Turing thesis to better understand the philosophy of science, theory-based conceptions, and the limits of falsifiability. In particular, I want to address what seems to me like the common misconception that the Church-Turing thesis is falsifiable.
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Cross-validation in finance, psychology, and political science

A large chunk of machine learning (although not all of it) is concerned with predictive modeling, usually in the form of designing an algorithm that takes in some data set and returns an algorithm (or sometimes, a description of an algorithm) for making predictions based on future data. In terminology more friendly to the philosophy of science, we may say that we are defining a rule of induction that will tell us how to turn past observations into a hypothesis for making future predictions. Of course, Hume tells us that if we are completely skeptical then there is no justification for induction — in machine learning we usually know this as a no-free lunch theorem. However, we still use induction all the time, usually with some confidence because we assume that the world has regularities that we can extract. Unfortunately, this just shifts the problem since there are countless possible regularities and we have to identify ‘the right one’.

Thankfully, this restatement of the problem is more approachable if we assume that our data set did not conspire against us. That being said, every data-set, no matter how ‘typical’ has some idiosyncrasies, and if we tune in to these instead of ‘true’ regularity then we say we are over-fitting. Being aware of and circumventing over-fitting is usually one of the first lessons of an introductory machine learning course. The general technique we learn is cross-validation or out-of-sample validation. One round of cross-validation consists of randomly partitioning your data into a training and validating set then running our induction algorithm on the training data set to generate a hypothesis algorithm which we test on the validating set. A ‘good’ machine learning algorithm (or rule for induction) is one where the performance in-sample (on the training set) is about the same as out-of-sample (on the validating set), and both performances are better than chance. The technique is so foundational that the only reliable way to earn zero on a machine learning assignments is by not doing cross-validation of your predictive models. The technique is so ubiquotes in machine learning and statistics that the StackExchange dedicated to statistics is named CrossValidated. The technique is so…

You get the point.

If you are a regular reader, you can probably induce from past post to guess that my point is not to write an introductory lecture on cross validation. Instead, I wanted to highlight some cases in science and society when cross validation isn’t used, when it needn’t be used, and maybe even when it shouldn’t be used.
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Misunderstanding falsifiability as a power philosophy of Scientism

KarlPopperI think that trying to find one slogan that captures all of science and nothing else is a fool’s errand. However, it is an appealing errand given our propensity to want to classify and delimit the things we care about. It is also an errand that often takes a central role in the philosophy of science.

Just like with almost any modern thought, if we try hard enough then we can trace philosophy of science back to the Greeks and discuss the contrasting views of Plato and Aristotle. As fun as such historical excursions might be, it seems a little silly given that the term scientist was not coined until 1833 and even under different names our current conception of scientists would not stretch much further back than the natural philosophers of the 17th century. Even the early empiricism of these philosophers, although essential as a backdrop and a foundation shift in view, is more of an overall metaphysical outlook than a dedicate philosophy of science.
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