Cancer metabolism and voluntary public goods games

When I first came to Tampa to do my Masters[1], my focus turned to explanations of the Warburg effect — especially a recent paper by Archetti (2014) — and the acid-mediated tumor invasion hypothesis (Gatenby, 1995; Basanta et al., 2008). In the course of our discussions about Archetti (2013,2014), Artem proposed the idea of combining two public goods, such as acid and growth factors. In an earlier post, Artem described the model that came out of these discussions. This model uses two “anti-correlated” public goods in tumors: oxygen (from vasculature) and acid (from glycolytic metabolism).

The dynamics of our model has some interesting properties such as an internal equilibrium and (as we showed later) cycles. When I saw these cycles I started to think about “games” with similar dynamics to see if they held any insights. One such model was Hauert et al.’s (2002) voluntary public goods game.[2] As I looked closer at our model and their model I realized that the properties and logic of these two models are much more similar than we initially thought. In this post, I will briefly explain Hauert et al.’s (2002) model and then discuss its potential application to cancer, and to our model.
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