Principles of biological computation: from circadian clock to evolution

For the final — third — day of the Santa Fe Institute workshop on “What is Biological Computation?” (11 – 13 September) organized by Albert Kao, Jessica Flack, and David Wolpert, we opened the floor to short impormptu talks from all the participants. The result was 21 presentations organized in 4 sessions. As with my posts on the previous two days of this workshop (Day 1: Elements of biological computation & stochastic thermodynamics of life; Day 2: The science and engineering of biological computation: from process to software to DNA-based neural networks), I want to briefly touch on all the presentations from the closing day in this post and the following. But this time I won’t follow the chronological order, and instead regroup slightly. In this post I’ll cover about half the talks, and save the discussion of collective computation for next week.

If you prefer my completely raw, unedited impressions in a series of chronological tweets, then you can look at the threads for the three days: Wednesday (14 tweets), Thursday (15 tweets), and Friday (31 tweets).

As before, it is important to note that this is the workshop through my eyes. So this retelling is subject to the limits of my understanding, notes, and recollection. This is especially distorting for this final day given the large number of 10 minute talks.

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