Fighting about frequency and randomly generating fitness landscapes

A couple of months ago, I was in Cambridge for the Evolution Evolving conference. It was a lot of fun, and it was nice to catch up with some familiar faces and meet some new ones. My favourite talk was Karen Kovaka‘s “Fighting about frequency”. It was an extremely well-delivered talk on the philosophy of science. And it engaged with a topic that has been very important to discussions of my own recent work. Although in my case it is on a much smaller scale than the general phenomenon that Kovaka was concerned with,

Let me first set up my own teacup, before discussing the more general storm.

Recently, I’ve had a number of chances to present my work on computational complexity as an ultimate constraint on evolution. And some questions have repeated again and again after several of the presentations. I want to address one of these persistent questions in this post.

How common are hard fitness landscapes?

This question has come up during review, presentations, and emails (most recently from Jianzhi Zhang’s reading group). I’ve spent some time addressing it in the paper. But it is not a question with a clear answer. So unsurprisingly, my comments have not been clear. Hence, I want to use this post to add some clarity.

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