Mathtimidation by analytic solution vs curse of computing by simulation

Recently, I was chatting with Patrick Ellsworth about the merits of simulation vs analytic solutions in evolutionary game theory. As you might expect from my old posts on the curse of computing, and my enjoyment of classifying games into dynamic regimes, I started with my typical argument against simulations. However, as I searched for a positive argument for analytic solutions of games, I realized that I didn’t have a good one. Instead, I arrived at another negative argument — this time against analytic solutions of heuristic models.

Hopefully this curmudgeoning comes as no surprise by now.

But it did leave me in a rather confused state.

Given that TheEGG is meant as a place to share such confusions, I want to use this post to set the stage for the simulation vs analytic debate in EGT and then rehearse my arguments. I hope that, dear reader, you will then help resolve the confusion.

First, for context, I’ll share my own journey from simulations to analytic approaches. You can see a visual sketch of it above. Second, I’ll present an argument against simulations — at least as I framed that argument around the time I arrived at Moffitt. Third, I’ll present the new argument against analytic approaches. At the end — as is often the case — there will be no resolution.

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