Labyrinth: Fitness landscapes as mazes, not mountains

Tonight, I am passing through Toulouse on my way to Montpellier for the 2nd Joint Congress on Evolutionary Biology. If you are also attending then find me on 21 August at poster P-0861 on level 2 to learn about computational complexity as an ultimate constraint on evolution.

During the flight over, I was thinking about fitness landscapes. Unsurprising — I know. A particular point that I try to make about fitness landscapes in my work is that we should imagine them as mazes, not as mountain ranges. Recently, Raoul Wadhwa reminded me that I haven’t written about the maze metaphor on the blog. So now is a good time to write on labyrinths.

On page 356 of The roles of mutation, inbreeding, crossbreeding, and selection in evolution, Sewall Wright tells us that evolution proceeds on a fitness landscape. We are to imagine these landscapes as mountain ranges, and natural selection as a walk uphill. What follows — signed by Dr. Jorge Lednem Beagle, former navigator of the fitness maze — throws unexpected light on this perspective. The first two pages of the record are missing.

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