EGT Reading Group 56 – 60

Since my last update in February, the evolutionary game theory reading group has passed another milestone with 5 more meetings over the last 4 months. We looked at a broad range of topics, from life histories in cancer to the effects of heterogeneity and biodiversity. From the definitions of fitness to analyzing digital pathology. Part of this variety came from suggested papers by the group members. The paper for EGT 57 was suggested by Jill Gallaher, EGT 58 by Robert Vander Velde, and the second paper for EGT 60 came from a tip by Jacob Scott. We haven’t yet recovered our goal of regular weekly meetings, but we’ve more than halved the time it took for these five meetings compared to the previous ones.

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Acidity and vascularization as linear goods in cancer

Last month, Robert Vander Velde discussed a striking similarity between the linear version of our model of two anti-correlated goods and the Hauert et al. (2002) optional public good game. Robert didn’t get a chance to go into the detailed math behind the scenes, so I wanted to do that today. The derivations here will be in the context of mathematical oncology, but will follow the earlier ecological work closely. There is only a small (and generally inconsequential) difference in the mathematics of the double anti-correlated goods and the optional public goods games. Keep your eye out for it, dear reader, and mention it in the comments if you catch it.[1]

In this post, I will remind you of the double goods game for acidity and vascularization, show you how to simplify the resulting fitness functions in the linear case — without using the approximations of the general case — and then classify the possible dynamics. From the classification of dynamics, I will speculate on how to treat the game to take us from one regime to another. In particular, we will see the importance of treating anemia, that buffer therapy can be effective, and not so much for bevacizumab.

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Eukaryotes without Mitochondria and Aristotle’s Ladder of Life

In 348/7 BC, fearing anti-Macedonian sentiment or disappointed with the control of Plato’s Academy passing to Speusippus, Aristotle left Athens for Asian Minor across the Aegean sea. Based on his five years[1] studying of the natural history of Lesbos, he wrote the pioneering work of zoology: The History of Animals. In it, he set out to catalog the what of biology before searching for the answers of why. He initiated a tradition of naturalists that continues to this day.

Aristotle classified his observations of the natural world into a hierarchical ladder of life: humans on top, above the other blooded animals, bloodless animals, and plants. Although we’ve excised Aristotle’s insistence on static species, this ladder remains for many. They consider species as more complex than their ancestors, and between the species a presence of a hierarchy of complexity with humans — as always — on top. A common example of this is the rationality fetish that views Bayesian learning as a fixed point of evolution, or ranks species based on intelligence or levels-of-consciousness. This is then coupled with an insistence on progress, and gives them the what to be explained: the arc of evolution is long, but it bends towards complexity.

In the early months of TheEGG, Julian Xue turned to explaining the why behind the evolution of complexity with ideas like irreversible evolution as the steps up the ladder of life.[2] One of Julian’s strongest examples of such an irreversible step up has been the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes through the acquisition of membrane-bound organelles like mitochondria. But as an honest and dedicated scholar, Julian is always on the lookout for falsifications of his theories. This morning — with an optimistic “there goes my theory” — he shared the new Kamkowska et al. (2016) paper showing a surprising what to add to our natural history: a eukaryote without mitochondria. An apparent example of a eukaryote stepping down a rung in complexity by losing its membrane-bound ATP powerhouse.
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Population dynamics from time-lapse microscopy

Half a month ago, I introduced you to automated time-lapse microscopy, but I showed the analysis of only a single static image. I didn’t take advantage of the rich time-series that the microscope provides for us. A richness that becomes clearest with video:

Above, you can see two types of non-small cell lung cancer cells growing in the presence of 512 nmol of Alectinib. The cells fluorescing green are parental cells that are susceptible to the drug, and the ones in red have an evolved resistance. In the 3 days of the video, you can see the cells growing and expanding. It is the size of these populations that we want to quantify.

In this post, I will remedy last week’s omission and share some empirical population dynamics. As before, I will include some of the Python code I built for these purposes. This time the code is specific to how our microscope exports its data, and so probably not as generalizable as one might want. But hopefully it will still give you some ideas on how to code analysis for your own experiments, dear reader. As always, the code is on my github.

Although the opening video considers two types of cancer cells competing, for the rest of the post I will consider last week’s system: coculturing Alectinib-sensitive (parental) non-small cell lung cancer and fibroblasts in varying concentrations of Alectinib. Finally, this will be another tools post so the only conclusions are of interest as sanity checks. Next week I will move on to more interesting observations using this sort of pipeline.
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