Counting cancer cells with computer vision for time-lapse microscopy

Competing cellsSome people characterize TheEGG as a computer science blog. And although (theoretical) computer science almost always informs my thought, I feel like it has been a while since I have directly dealt with the programming aspects of computer science here. Today, I want to remedy that. In the process, I will share some Python code and discuss some new empirical data collected by Jeff Peacock and Andriy Marusyk.[1]

Together with David Basanta and Jacob Scott, the five of us are looking at the in vitro dynamics of resistance to Alectinib in non-small cell lung cancer. Alectinib is a new ALK-inhibitor developed by the Chugai Pharmaceutical Co. that was approved for clinical use in Japan in 2014, and in the USA at the end of 2015. Currently, it is intended for tough lung cancer cases that have failed to respond to crizotinib. Although we are primarily interested in how alectinib resistance develops and unfolds, we realize the importance of the tumour’s microenvironment, so one of our first goals — and the focus here — is to see how the Alectinib sensitive cancer cells interact with healthy fibroblasts. Since I’ve been wanting to learn basic computer vision skills and refresh my long lapsed Python knowledge, I decided to hack together some cell counting algorithms to analyze our microscopy data.[2]

In this post, I want to discuss some of our preliminary work although due to length constraints there won’t be any results of interest to clinical oncologist in this entry. Instead, I will introduce automated microscopy to computer science readers, so that they know another domain where their programming skills can come in useful; and discuss some basic computer vision so that non-computational biologists know how (some of) their cell counters (might) work on the inside. Thus, the post will be methods heavy and part tutorial, part background, with a tiny sprinkle of experimental images.[3] I am also eager for some feedback and tips from readers that are more familiar than I am with these methods. So, dear reader, leave your insights in the comments.

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