Variation for supply driven evolution

I’ve taken a very long hiatus (nearly 5 years!) from this blog. I suppose getting married and getting an MD are good excuses, but Artem has very kindly let me return. And I greatly appreciate this chance, because I’d like to summarize an idea I had been working on for a while. So far, only two publication has come out of it (Xue et al., 2015a,b), but it’s an idea that has me excited. So excited that I defended a thesis on it this Tuesday. For now, I call it supply-driven evolution, where I try to show how the generation of variation can determine long-term evolution.

Evolutionary theoreticians have long known that how variation is generated has a decisive role in evolutionary outcome. The reason is that natural selection can only choose among what has been generated, so focusing on natural selection will not produce a full understanding of evolution. But how does variation affect evolution, and can variation be the decisive factor in how evolution proceeds? I believe that the answer is “frequently, yes,” because it does not actually compete with natural selection. I’ll do a brief overview of the literature in the first few posts. By the end, I hope how this mechanism can explain some forms of irreversible evolution, stuff I had blogged about five years ago.

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