Rogers’ paradox: Why cheap social learning doesn’t raise mean fitness

It’s Friday night, you’re lonely, you’re desperate and you’ve decided to do the obvious—browse Amazon for a good book to read—when, suddenly, you’re told that you’ve won one for free. Companionship at last! But, as you look at the terms and conditions, you realize that you’re only given a few options to choose from. You have no idea what to pick, but luckily you have some help: Amazon lets you read through the first chapter of each book before choosing and, now that you think about it, your friend has read most of the books on the list as well. So, how do you choose your free book?

If you answered “read the first chapter of each one,” then you’re a fan of asocial/individual learning. If you decided to ask your friend for a recommendation, then you’re in favor of social learning. Individual learning would probably have taken far more time here than social learning, which is thought to be a common scenario: Social learning’s prevalence is often explained in terms of its ability to reduce costs—such as metabolic, opportunity or predation costs—below those incurred by individual learning (Aoki et al., 2005; Kendal et al., 2005; Laland, 2004). However, a model by Rogers (1988) famously showed that this is not the whole story behind social learning’s evolution.
Read more of this post