Models, modesty, and moral methodology

In highschool, I had the privilege to be part of a program that focused on the humanities and social sciences, critical thinking, and building research skills. The program’s crown was a semester of grade eleven (early 2005) dedicated to working on independent research for a project of our own design. For my project, I poured over papers and books at the University of Saskatchewan library, trying to come up with a semi-coherent thesis on post-cold war religious violence. Maybe this is why my first publications in college were on ethnocentrism? It’s a hard question to answer, but I doubt that the connection was that direct. As I was preparing to head to McGill, I had ambition to study political science and physics, but I was quickly disenchanted with the idea, and ended up focusing on theoretical computer science, physics, and math. When I returned to the social sciences in late 2008, it was with the arrogance typical of a physicist first entering a new field.

In the years since — along with continued modeling — I have tried to become more conscious of the types and limitations of models and their role in knowledge building and rhetoric. In particular, you might have noticed a recent trend of posts on the social sciences and various dangers of Scientism. These are part of an on-going discussions with Adam Elkus and reading the Dart-Throwing Chimp. Recently, Jay Ulfelder shared a fun quip on why skeptics make bad pundits:

First Rule of Punditry: I know everything; nothing is complicated.

First Rule of Skepticism: I know nothing; everything is complicated.

Which gets at an important issue common to many public-facing sciences, like climate, social, or medicine, among others. Academics are often encouraged to be skeptical, both of their work and others, and precise in the scope of their predictions. Although self-skepticism and precision is sometimes eroded away by the need to publish ‘high-impact’ results. I would argue that without factions, divisions, and debate, science would find progress — whatever that means — much more difficult. Academic rhetoric, however, is often incompatible with political rhetoric, since — as Jay Ulfelder points out — the latter relies much more on certainty, conviction, and the force with which you deliver your message. What should a policy oriented academic do?
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