Big data, prediction, and scientism in the social sciences

Much of my undergrad was spent studying physics, and although I still think that a physics background is great for a theorists in any field, there are some downsides. For example, I used to make jokes like: “soft isn’t the opposite of hard sciences, easy is.” Thankfully, over the years I have started to slowly grow out of these condescending views. Of course, apart from amusing anecdotes, my past bigotry would be of little importance if it wasn’t shared by a surprising number of grown physicists. For example, Sabine Hossenfelder — an assistant professor of physics in Frankfurt — writes in a recent post:

If you need some help with the math, let me know, but that should be enough to get you started! Huh? No, I don't need to read your thesis, I can imagine roughly what it says.It isn’t so surprising that social scientists themselves are unhappy because the boat of inadequate skills is sinking in the data sea and physics envy won’t keep it afloat. More interesting than the paddling social scientists is the public opposition to the idea that the behavior of social systems can be modeled, understood, and predicted.

As a blogger I understand that we can sometimes be overly bold and confrontational. As an informal medium, I have no fundamental problem with such strong statements or even straw-men if they are part of a productive discussion or critique. If there is no useful discussion, I would normally just make a small comment or ignore the post completely, but this time I decided to focus on Hossenfelder’s post because it highlights a common symptom of interdisciplinitis: an outsider thinking that they are addressing people’s critique — usually by restating an obvious and irrelevant argument — while completely missing the point. Also, her comments serve as a nice bow to tie together some thoughts that I’ve been wanting to write about recently.
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