Computational theories of evolution

If you look at your typical computer science department’s faculty list, you will notice the theorists are a minority. Sometimes they are further subdivided by being culled off into mathematics departments. As such, any institute that unites and strengthens theorists is a good development. That was my first reason for excitement two years ago when I learned that a $60 million grant would establish the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing at UC, Berkeley. The institute’s mission is close to my heart: bringing the study of theoretical computer science to bear on the natural sciences; an institute for the algorithmic lens. My second reason for excitement was that one of the inaugural programs is evolutionary biology and the theory of computing. Throughout this term, a series workshops are being held to gather and share the relevant experience.

Right now, I have my conference straw hat on, as I wait for a flight transfer in Dallas on my way to one of the events in this program, the workshop on computational theories of evolution. For the next week I will be in Berkeley absorbing all there is to know on the topic. Given how much I enjoyed Princeton’s workshop on natural algorithms in the sciences, I can barely contain my excitement.
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