Dogs are hosts to the oldest and most widely disseminated cancer

SugarA little while ago, I got a new friend and roommate: Sugar. She is very docile, loves walks and belly-rubs, but isn’t a huge fan of other dogs. Her previous owner was an elderly woman that couldn’t take Sugar outside during most of the year — if you haven’t heard, Montreal is pretty difficult to walk around during winter. This resulted in less exposure to other dogs leading to an anti-social attitude, and less exercise which (combined with Sugar’s adorable demands for food) made Sugar overweight. She now gets plenty of exercise and is slowly returning to a healthy weight and attitude.

But, you can never be too careful, so Sugar will go in for a check-up on Monday. Just like humans, dogs have many treatable conditions, and for some — like cancer — it is better to catch them early. But when it comes to cancer, there is one things that sets dogs apart from nearly all other species: they are susceptible to one of only two known naturally occurring clonally transmissible cancers — canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT).

That’s right, a contagious cancer. More precisely a single clonal line that has been living as as a parasitic life form for over 11,000 years (Murchison, Wedge et al., 2014)!
Read more of this post