NK and block models of fitness landscapes

On February 12, 2001, the human genome project released its first formal report. It was a great day for biology, and a wonderful birthday present for Darwin. However, it was also a humbling confrontation with complexity and prompted Steven Jay Gould to write in the New York Times:

[The Human Genome project revealed that] Home sapiens possesses between 30,000 and 40,000 … [only twice as many as the tiny roundworm] … The key to complexity is not more genes, but more combinations and interactions generated by fewer units of code … [their function] cannot be predicted from the separate underlying parts alone.

The one gene to one protein paradigm was overthrown, the 40k genes were simply not enough to generate the over 140k identified proteins in the human body. For evolutionary biology, the new view meant that changing one gene could affect (and would affect, in most cases) many proteins and thus have several different contributions to fitness. Biologists needed a model of fitness landscapes where the genes could interact with each other, allow for varying combinations, and manifest epistasis.
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